Inadmissibility Or Ineligibility For Admission to The US

Occasionally, I run into a classmate who surprises me. Some people live up to our expectations, especially the extremely talented or extremely troubled. Others surprise us.

A couple years back I reunited with an old friend. Growing up, he was quiet, shy and unlikely to stray far from Eastern North Carolina. I was not surprised he became a construction manager. I was shocked, however, to learn he took a position as a safety inspector in the Middle East.

Originally, my friend was attracted to the extra pay. (I assumed it was hazard pay, given all the problems over the last twenty years.) As it happened, he fell in love with the people.

The one thing that stood out to me was that almost everyone he encountered was fascinated by the United States. And, most wanted to move here.

During my twenty-eight years of practice, we have experienced peace and prosperity, terrorist attacks on United States soil, and recessions. Now we are in the midst of a pandemic, deep political divisions, and protests to police tactics.

Still, my clients from other countries almost all want to stay in or have the option to return to the United States. Next to deportation, the ability to reenter the United States is their most pressing concern. “Can I come back after visiting family for Christmas?” “What happens if I am transferred back home for a while?”

The answers to are not always clear. In fact, these questions are often more difficult to answer than whether a particular plea results in removal. Usually, we consult an immigration lawyer.

Nonetheless, we created a guide to reference for these questions. It helps us advise our clients about what to expect or, at least, the questions they should be asking. We included a copy for you and hope you find it helpful.

If we can help you in any way, don’t hesitate to call.