You just got to turn some people off

Chapel Hill is a bit of an island in our state. Commonly accepted views here may not be so commonly accepted in other parts of the state. In fact, I am pretty confident that some of the commonly accepted views in my home of over thirty-five years have not made it to New Bern, my home as a child.

But Chapel Hill may be considered conservative compared to its western neighbor, Carrboro, also known as “The Paris of the Piedmont.” Carrboro’s people are eccentric, even among the eccentric.

Right in the center of town is Weaver Street Market, a popular and successful food coop. Before the pandemic, Weaver Street bustled with activity and energy. You can still buy all kinds of locally sourced, organic food, but hanging out in the dining room or front lawn is prohibited for now.

Normally, the front lawn would be full of people on a nice day. Even on a Tuesday or Wednesday. Even at 10 in the morning or 2 in the afternoon.

When my friend’s son asked his advice about selecting a college major, my friend responded, “I don’t know. Ask those people who sit in front of Weaver Street drinking coffee all day what they majored in. It worked out for them.”

I know and adore some of these folks. Unfortunately, some have my cell phone number and include me in group texts.

Almost every few minutes this week I got a new update or a little wisdom about the election. Random posts abounded from people who appear to have no occupation, much less training in statistics, math, or political science.

I was interested in the election too. But that interest coincided with a federal court appearance, a brief due in the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, and preparation for court scheduled everyday next week. For most of us, life went on as we voted, counted, and watched the results.

I considered several subtle responses to the texts:

(1) Could you resume these this evening?
(2) We have access to the news, as well.
(3) Get a #$%^&*! job.

Alas, I finally decided, you just need to turn some people off.

We are criminal trial lawyers. We represent people accused of criminal offenses who risk losing everything. We work to get them their best results and back to leading productive lives.

Call if you need us, or if you just want to say hello.

Amos

P.S. If you think the group texts are exhausting now, wait until basketball season.